The most butchered punctuation mark in the English language. Apostrophes are used
1) to
indicate contractions,
2) to indicate possession (in some cases), and
3) VERY occasionally to denote a plural (where otherwise the meaning of the sentence would be unclear).

The use of an apostrophe in the contraction "it's", (which means "it is"), but not in "its", (which is a possessive) causes problems for many people who didn't pass third grade.
Incorrect: Screw you moran's. Go USA.
Incorrect: Its raining cat's and dog's.
Incorrect: Here come's the train. Grab it's cargo.

Correct: Don't go in that room.
Correct: The cat's litter box is dirty.
Correct: Mind your p's and q's.
(the above is one of the ONLY CORRECT USES OF AN APOSTROPHE TO DENOTE A PLURAL. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD IF YOU'RE UNSURE, JUST LEAVE THE APOSTROPHE OUT.)
supaDISC가 작성 2005년 02월 24일 (목)

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